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Neil Winton and Wintonsworld

About Neil Winton and Wintonsworld

All About Neil Winton and Wintonsworld

WintonsWorld is dedicated to the truth about cars in particular and the global automotive industry in general.

My contacts in the investment banking, academic and consultancy world are second to none. These experts will tell you about the health and direction of the biggest automotive manufacturers, free of the self-serving blather provided by corporate sycophants.

Cars are judged on their honesty, practicality, quality and value for money, not on their nought to sixty times, or whether they induce over-steer at the limit, whatever that is. Wintonsworld doesn’t rely on advertising so I can say what I think without the taint of commercial pressure.

I worked for Reuters, the international news agency, for 33 years, where my last job was European Auto Correspondent. I was also Reuters’ Science and Technology Correspondent, and worked as an editor and reporter in Brussels, New York, London and Toronto.

Neil Winton

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3 Responses to Neil Winton and Wintonsworld

  1. Per Norinder February 3, 2017 at 8:41 pm #

    Dear All, with Neil we will see an objective set-back series of reviews on car industry.
    I, as a car industry senior, can see that this site will add to a global understanding, especially of European car industries’ place in the world. Thanks, Neil.

  2. Michael Mullen April 9, 2020 at 4:09 am #

    I just finished reading your article “Volvo’s Polestar Electric Car Will Take On The World In 2020” in your Forbes article dated Oct. 27, 2019. Knowing that the Polestar 2 will be equipped with a 78 kWh battery, I was more than a little amused to read that it will “likely” have a 300-mile range.

    This stood out to me because it would imply the motors and controllers are even more efficient than the same in the Tesla Model 3. I say this because the photos leave no doubt in my mind that it is not nearly as aerodynamically efficient. It will also weigh more. So the only way it could achieve a 300-mile range with 78 kWh is to be much more efficient in other areas.

    I know you profess to be for the straight scoop and the “real deal” when it comes to auto-reporting, so I can only imagine you were bamboozled by the industry experts who fooled you into believing that which is unbelievable.

    I also found the likely price of $63,000 to be highly suspect. Polestar does not have the vertical integration or manufacturing efficiencies demonstrated by Tesla so I find the price you claim as “likely” to be highly doubtful. Unless Polestar is designed to be a money-losing venture. I would love to see the Polestar 2 succeed in America but if it doesn’t have the claimed 300 miles of range and the low price of $63,000, I’m afraid it cannot compete and will sell in very low volumes.

  3. Philip Carlson May 17, 2020 at 1:12 pm #

    HI Neal!

    Commenting on your article about Batteries vs Hydrogen fuel cells you rightly discussed the difficulties with sourcing hydrogen but you left out nuclear as a producer of hydrogen. There is very active research on this and the potential for nuclear produced hydrogen may be much more efficient and prodigious than with renewables, and may also work well together with renewables. Buses in Toledo will be running on hydrogen produced at the David Besse nuclear power plant as part of a research project, one of a number of such projects around the world. Most auto executives think fuel cells are the future from what I read.

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